Five Bartending Tips

So you’re new to the job. The bar is aflutter with innumerable orders. You have to monitor those orders, maintain the cleanliness of the bar, and serve drinks with finesse in one of the country’s most chaotic hospitality industries. How to kick-off your bartending career smoothly? Here are some tips on how to be a great bartender.

Be Professional

Maintain a good, straight posture at all times, as well as an air of confidence and approachability. Don’t shy away from customers. Jump into the throng and ask them their orders as soon as they sit down. Consult with your co-workers on the best way to greet patrons – it’s often harder than you think! If you see someone perusing the cocktail menu for a longer-than-usual time, suggest a drink. Nine times out of ten, they’ll go with your expertise and really appreciate the guidance.

Be honest. Patrons put their trust in you, the bartender, to ensure that they are not overcharged or under-served. Do not pour less than what is required. Don’t even think of inflating tabs for your own drinking amusement after hours. To do so is grossly unprofessional and will ruin the reputation of the bar at which you work. It may even cost you your job.

Keep Occupied

As the new kid at the bar, you’ll probably be given a period of grace in which to get oriented. This means that your first shifts will take place during quieter hours. This is a great time to breathe deeply and come to grips with your surroundings. It’s not, however, the perfect occasion to haul out the iPhone and indulge in a few rounds of Angry Birds! Use this time to maintain the bar area. Mop the floor and polish some glasses. Consult with your more experienced co-workers on drink-making tips.

Don’t get stuck

It’s important to establish a good rapport with your clients, especially regulars. Feel free to chat with and get to know them– only if it doesn’t interfere with your other bartending duties. If something comes up that demands your attention, politely excuse yourself from the conversation, complete the task at hand, and return.

Grow a Thick Skin

In your working environment, people will drink and get rowdy. Co-workers will feel the pressure of mounting orders and may be more abrupt with you than usual. Do not take it to heart. Bartending can be stressful work and unleash the snappiness in anyone. Keep a positive attitude, and don’t let your frustrations spill into your interactions with pleasant clients. Be alert, however, for deliberate malicious behaviour – from both co-bartenders and customers. If you find that their behaviour is affecting the quality of your work, talk to your boss and bring the situation under control.

Stay on Your Toes

Bar activity can fluctuate from the dead hours of the afternoon to the heaving chaos of Happy Hour. It is during the busiest times that you need to be alert. Watch out for aggressive behaviour, and keep your eyes peeled for any broken glasses or spillages. Develop a memory system to stay on top of orders. Getting to know your regulars and how they prefer their drinks is one such method. Anticipation is also key. Be aware of your stock count from every straw to every lemon. This type of heightened awareness will ensure the efficient and smooth running of your bar.

Above all else, enjoy your work. Develop good relationships with regulars and charm new customers. A solid client base will ensure buzzing business for your bar for years to come.

Responsible Service of Alcohol in Australia

If you are interested in working in a bar, then an RSA qualification is essential. It is a mandatory course for anyone involved in the sale and distribution of liquor in Australia in bars, hotels, clubs or shops. RSA stands for the Responsible Service of Alcohol, and equips the bartender with all of the information needed to sell alcohol legally in the country.

The purpose of an RSA certificate is to ensure that liquor is consumed in a safe and enjoyable environment.  It gives bar-workers the right to implement policies in accordance with the Liquor Control Act of 1988. Bar staff are responsible for controlling all of the elements that may threaten the safety of the bar and its patrons. Accountabilities include the prevention of irresponsible drinking, drunk driving and the underage consumption of alcohol.

RSA legislation outlines what constitutes a Standard Drink, which in Australia, is anything containing six grams of alcohol. These parameters should be adhered to stringently. Typical Standard Drinks refer to the following quantities: 285ml for strong beers, 375ml for medium-strength beers, 30ml for spirits like vodka or gin, 100ml for red, white and sparkling wines and 60 ml for fortified wines.

RSA notes the illegality of selling liquor to anyone under the age of eighteen on licensed premises. It also gives bartenders license to refuse service to anyone displaying overt signs of intoxication. Practices leading to the excessive or rapid consumption of liquor should be controlled or prohibited.

Australian RSA courses also include the bartender’s Duty of Care. This section highlights the social and health-related implications of binge drinking. It reveals the main differences between enjoyable, responsible drinking and dangerous imbibing practices. It also teaches bartenders to look out for the signs of excessive consumption. Loud, bombastic or anti-social behaviour; aggression and physical violence;  lack of co-ordination marked by unsteadiness, falling or bumping into people; glazed eyes or drowsiness – all of these indicators reveal the negative effects of excessive consumption. The RSA will inform the bartender on how best to assist people experiencing such symptoms, and how to ensure they get home safely. Other sections cover blood alcohol content.

RSA-qualified bartenders also know how to handle the potentially explosive situations that arise when liquor and people mix. They are informed on how to mitigate any problematic circumstances with fairness and firmness, and how to refuse service if needs be. These are the most challenging aspects of the bartending industry and often require patience and assertiveness on the part of the bar staff.

Reputable RSA courses are offered by registered training organisations. Debate continues to rage about the benefits of online RSA learning versus in-class training. However, online courses are fast becoming a convenient way for aspiring bartenders to obtain their necessary preparations, especially those living in rural areas. A thorough search of the web will reveal a range of courses from reliable agencies. If, however, you wish to attend classes, search for any TAFE-accredited college in your area. A good RSA certificate will ensure that you land a good bartending job at a trustworthy establishment.

How to Get a Job in a Bar

A successful bartending career can be lucrative. It is also flexible enough to attract students (especially those wishing to fund their studies), travellers and people looking for a boost to their regular income. However, good bar jobs are hard to come by, and the hunt for these much-desired positions can be very competitive. How, then, to get a job in a bar?

Training is Key

These days, it’s hard to land a solid bartending job without some degree of training. Employers are more inclined to hire someone with experience over a fresh newbie. Furthermore, Australian liquor legislation dictates that you can only be hired after completing an RSA (Responsible Service of Alcohol) course. This program, which can be completed online or at any TAFE-accredited college, will ensure that you have adequate knowledge to serve alcohol legally in the country.

Browse the web and source a good bartending school in your area. A basic course will teach you all you need to know about the art of making great drinks. Indeed, bartending is a job that requires dexterity and finesse – much like playing a musical instrument. Therefore, there’s no substitute for thorough hands-on training. Bartending School will show you how to master the intricacies of mixing cocktails and pouring a stellar beer. You’ll also develop the necessary skills for running an efficient bar service. More importantly, you’ll receive some valuable advice on how to deal with the difficult clients and problems associated with excessive drinking.

Network

Before you get your training underway, make some friends in the industry and pick their brains for some invaluable insider pearls-of-wisdom. Do you have a favourite hangout spot? Befriend the staff and talk to them about the field whenever they’re available. Tip them well and be a positive presence in the bar – you might score a meeting with the manager.

Sharpen your observation skills. You’ll get an exclusive front-seat view of all of the necessary tricks of the trade. Find out what it takes to pour the perfect lager, or mix the best martini. Is there a special system in place for keeping track of orders? How do they handle out-of-hand patrons? Observing will impart to you a range of skills that are just as important as those learned at a bartending academy.

Dress the Part

Assess the look and feel of the bar at which you would like to work – and copy that look for your interview. If it’s a swanky cocktail venue you have in mind, then sophistication is king. If you’re interested in working at a hipper, more youth-oriented establishment, sport an edgier, trendier style. And if it’s a dive or pub you’re after, it wouldn’t hurt to look like you mean business and go for a tougher appearance.

Prepare for Your Interview

Managers are looking for bartenders with personality. Allow your character to shine through in a well-written cover letter, and let your cover letter complement your interview. Be professional, confident and enthusiastic. Bosses want energetic, cheerful staff to keep the customers happy and loyal. They are also looking for flexibility – especially with regards to working hours and on-the-job responsibilities. Moreover, they want to see that you have the assertiveness required to handle the more demanding aspects of the job and ensure that liquor consumption policy is executed responsibly.

Bartending is not a job for everyone. It requires heavy investments of time, energy and concentration. However, it can be a rewarding, profitable and enjoyable experience for those who are up to the challenge.

RSA Certification in Queensland

Since January of 2009, the RSA or Responsible Service of Alcohol certificate has become a requirement to people working or involved in the liquor industry.  This includes everyone who is involved in serving, supplying or selling alcoholic beverages.

How to get RSA certificate in Queensland?  You need to have your training with a trainer or training provider who is certified or approved by the OLGR or Office of Liquor and Gaming Regulation.  For a complete list, the government website of Queensland has a list of those they have approved including contact details.  You have to keep in mind that not all the training providers or trainers who offer RSA certification are recognized or approved by OLGR.

All new employees who are involved in serving or supplying of liquor have a maximum of 30 days from the day they were hired to get the said certificate.  Some may ask “how to get RSA within 30 days?”  You do not have to worry about it since the course can be finished in just a few hours once you have registered for it.  In Queensland, it would usually take 5 hours for the course to be finished both online and face to face.  The certificate will last only for three years which you have to renew before it expires.

Even the volunteers are required to go through RSA certification however, they are excluded if they are under the following license category:

  • Community club license
  • Community other license
  • Community liquor permit
  • Restricted liquor permit

In such cases, the individual or company who are making use or welcome volunteers to their establishment should have a person to oversee the trainees but that individual should have RSA certificate.

Queensland also honors certificates that are completed through the national RSA course.  The only thing these individuals should do on how to get RSA certificate in the state is to complete a bridging module with a trainer or training provider approved by the OLGR.

In whatever step you take to getting certified of your RSA, keep in mind that you are doing things right and that you are getting it from the right sources.

Responsible Service of Alcohol in Australia

If you are interested in working in a bar, then an RSA qualification is essential. It is a mandatory course for anyone involved in the sale and distribution of liquor in Australia in bars, hotels, clubs or shops. RSA stands for the Responsible Service of Alcohol, and equips the bartender with all ofthe information needed to sell alcohol legally in the country.

The purpose of an RSA certificate is to ensure that liquor is consumed in a safe and enjoyable environment.  It gives bar-workers the right to implement policies in accordance with the Liquor Control Act of 1988. Bar staff are responsible for controlling all of the elements that may threaten the safety of the bar and its patrons. Accountabilities include the prevention of irresponsible drinking, drunk driving and the underage consumption of alcohol.

RSA legislation outlines what constitutes a Standard Drink, which in Australia, is anything containing six grams of alcohol. These parameters should be adhered to stringently. Typical Standard Drinks refer to the following quantities: 285ml for strong beers, 375ml for medium-strength beers, 30ml for spirits like vodka or gin, 100ml for red, white and sparkling wines and 60 ml for fortified wines.

RSA notes the illegality of selling liquor to anyone under the age of eighteen on licensed premises. It also gives bartenders license to refuse service to anyone displaying overt signs of intoxication. Practices leading to the excessive or rapid consumption of liquor should be controlled or prohibited.

Australian RSA courses also include the bartender’s Duty of Care. This section highlights the social and health-related implications of binge drinking. It reveals the main differences between enjoyable, responsible drinking and dangerous imbibing practices. It also teaches bartenders to look out for the signs of excessive consumption. Loud, bombastic or anti-social behaviour; aggression and physical violence;  lack of co-ordination marked by unsteadiness, falling or bumping into people; glazed eyes or drowsiness – all of these indicators reveal the negative effects of excessive consumption. The RSA will inform the bartender on how best to assist people experiencing such symptoms, and how to ensure they get home safely. Other sections cover blood alcohol content.

RSA-qualified bartenders also know how to handle the potentially explosive situations that arise when liquor and people mix. They are informed on how to mitigate any problematic circumstances with fairness and firmness, and how to refuse service if needs be. These are the most challenging aspects of the bartending industry and often require patience and assertiveness on the part of the bar staff.

Reputable RSA courses are offered by registered training organisations. Debate continues to rage about the benefits of online RSA learning versus in-class training. However, online courses are fast becoming a convenient way for aspiring bartenders to obtain their necessary preparations, especially those living in rural areas. A thorough search of the web will reveal a range of courses from reliable agencies. If, however, you wish to attend classes, search for any TAFE-accredited college in your area. A good RSA certificate will ensure that you land a good bartending job at a trustworthy establishment.

Responsible Retailing of Alcohol in Australia

Responsible alcohol retailing is mandated in Australia.  To make this possible, business owners train their employees.  This does not only improve their skills, but also, displays a good business sense.  It is good for your business if your staff and employees areknowledgeable of the rules and know how to sell and serve alcohol safely.  It’s much better if your customers are informed about this too. This way, should any problem arise, you are sure of the safety of everyone in the venue, from your staff, your customers, up to your licensees because you have trained them, or got them trained in a quality training provider. Moreover, government agencies do conduct surprise visits to licensed premises every now and then to check on compliance to liquor laws and see if employees know-well about their jobs.  Thus, training for responsible alcohol retailing puts you and you business, on the safe side.

Another plus factor to training your employees is their becoming more responsible and committed to their job, putting higher value to it knowing that you exerted effort to invest in them, to enhance their capabilities and knowledge regarding their chosen profession.  Your patrons will also become confident and feel safe and secure while in your venue knowing that youvalue their patronage not only by obeying liquor laws but by attending to their welfare as well.

Responsible alcohol retailing is learning the basics of serving and selling alcohol safely.  This includes topics like how to identify and verify age of would be customers; how to professionally refuse a sale to minors and intoxicated persons; how to determine a standard drink, etc.

Training employees on responsible alcohol retailing (official course name: provide Responsible Service of Alcohol) has been made fairly easy for you and for them with the advent of online courses.   This makes training done easily and quickly enough.  Online courses are now available in most training institutions at reasonable rates.  The programs are simple and easy to complete.  The enrolees can go back to topics they find difficult until they pass and most online training service centres provide assistants to guide them to finish the training successfully.

A reputable business name is the key to a successful business enterprise.In today’s world of alcohol retailing where competition is stiff, training your people in responsible alcohol retailing or RSA is a guaranteed step to ensure you’re your company is on top of the game.

Effective Strategies of the Pros to Minimize Health Risks of Alcohol Consumption

As with all things in life, anything in excess is bad or at least has its down side.  This applies especially when it comes to alcohol consumption.  Excessive intake of alcohol is bad for the health.  It puts an individual at risk of developing alcohol-related problems such as health problems, anti-social behaviour and other forms of injuries.

The consumer must realize the danger of too much consumption of alcohol poses to himself and others around him.  That is the first step.  The next is to take steps to cut down on the amount of his or her alcohol intake.  Any change in his drinking habit a person makes can reduce the risks since lesser consumption of liquor or of any alcoholic drinks will decrease the chances of developing problems associated with alcohol.

There are several tips that can guide a person desiring to minimize the health risks of his or her alcohol consumption of his/her alcohol consumption. These are:

  • Drink only at licensed venues with employees who have Responsible Service of Alcohol (RSA) certificates.  RSA certificate holders know how to serve alcohol responsibly and are knowledgeable of methods to keep a safe and secured environment for everyone in the venue.  This means you are assured that you are drinking in a safe place for they will refuse to serve you and other patrons too much liquor.

 

  • Eat before you drink or while drinking. When your stomach is already full, almost full or filled with food, you reduce your cravings for more drinks.  Besides, it is not a nice feeling to drink on an empty stomach.

 

 

  • Know what a standard drink is. By knowing the appropriate measurement for a standard drink, you can then measure the amount of drinks you consume each time.

 

  • Set a realistic goal, set limits and follow them.  Do not set a goal too high you cannot achieve or too low it is so easy for you to accomplish.  Instead, set a goal that is achievable but one that can truly change your drinking consumption pattern.  To guide you, make a plan and commit it in writing, like the number of times you intend to drink on a day or a week. Maintain a journal to help you record your progress and remind you of the goal you have set for yourself.  When you go out to party, set your limits before you go and make a conscious resolve to follow this. Stick to your goals, whether drinking at home or in a bar or with friends or in a party.

 

  • Start with non-alcoholic drinks.  Many consumers vow that by beginning with non-alcoholic beverages and alternating it with alcoholic ones when drinking, does reduce their alcohol intake.

 

 

  • Drink slowly.  You can do this by pacing your drinks; sip and drink slowly.  This way, you extend the life of each glass or bottle,in effect, reducing the amount of alcohol you consume.

 

  • Count your drinks.  You can do this by recording the number of drinks you already have taken to help you realize the level of your consumption.

 

 

Binge Drinking in Australia

Binge drinking and the numerous problems associated with it such as alcohol-fuelled violence and road accidents remain a major concern in Australia.  For this reason, the call to serve alcohol responsibly by pubs, bars, restaurants and similar licensed premises remains loud. The media also has been talking about the responsibility of these licensed venues to serve alcohol safely,the growing problem of binge drinking among teenagers and what is known as Gen Y and the resultant violence involving drunk persons.

Statistics show that Australia ranks 4th in beer consumption per capita and 14th in highest alcohol consumption by volume worldwide.  One factor that can be attributed to this ranking is that alcohol consumption also called binge drinking is culturally acceptable in Australia.   While binge drinking is frowned upon in other countries, this is not so in Australia where it appears that the more a person drinks, the more he brags about it.

Another factor is the abundance of pubs and bars and other licensed premises on the streets.  This implies that any person who has been refused to be served alcohol in one pub can just walk to the pub next door and more likely get served there.  Due to stiff competition among bars, bar owners tend to ignore liquor laws.  The next pub would usually be more than happy to serve a customer no matter if and when he has already imbibed more than the standard drink.

As a result, binge drinking abounds; the number of incidents (physical injury, theft, vehicular accidents) related to alcohol intake increases.  Health problems such as short term memory loss related to alcohol consumption are also on the rise.

To be fair, the Australian government has not been remised.  In addition to requiring all persons involved in the sale and service of alcohol to possess Responsible Service of Alcohol (RSA) certificate, the government has been considering raising the legal drinking age to 21.

Moreover, binge drinking should not be the concern of government only but of the entire community.  After all, safer communities should be the concern of everyone.

 

Funny Coopers Commercial

If you are looking for a job to serve, supply and sell alcohol in any licensed venue in Australia, perhaps you are aware that a Responsible Service of Alcohol certificate (RSA Certificate) is one of the legal requirements you need to obtain. Whilst you’re looking for information about an RSA Certificate, we thought we would entertian you for a minute and then let you get back to finding out more information about an RSA Certificate. We found this funny Coopers YouTube commercial, which we thought we would share with you, so check it out.

YouTube Preview Image

RSA Certification in New South Wales

RSA or Responsible Service of Alcohol certificate is a requirement for any individual to be eligible in working at licensed establishments in New South Wales that are serving or selling alcohol.

Before, how to get RSA certificate would only mean going to class and attend the lecture that can take hours to finish.  Today, there are numerous online training providers that are accredited by the NSW government that will allow you to get certified without leaving the comfort of your home.  When it comes to getting your photo competency card however, you have to go to the Australian Post in person.

Since the year 2011, the previous paper certificates are replaced by RSA photo competency card for any individual who has gone through the RSA course.  The said photo competency card has simple requirements.

  • Interim certificate (this you will receive after your RSA training in lieu of the previous paper certificate)
  • At least 1 primary identification document (e.g. passport, birth certificate and Australian citizenship certificate) or 2.
  • Secondary identification document (e.g. license issued in Australia and foreign driver’s license).
  • Additional identification documents (e.g. proof of age card, NSW photo card, tertiary education ID, Medicare, insurance documents, MVR documents, workcover license and more).

Keep in mind that the primary identification documents has 70 points each, the secondary has 40 and the additional has 25 points each.  It is required that an applicant should have at least 100 points for his identification to be verified.

Cost for the card is currently set to $70 according to OLGR (Office of Liquor, Gaming and Racing) in NSW but are usually paid together with the RSA training and not separately.  The cost required on how to get RSA however will depend on the training provider that you have chosen.

Individuals who already have previously acquired their RSA certificate will still be able to use it but not beyond 2016 when the certificate will eventually be phased out.  To students who graduated from 22 of August 2011 and beyond, the photo card will be required.  However, to those who were issued the paper certificate from 2000 and earlier, a refresher course will be required before the photo card will be released.

RSA certification in New South Wales has been made easy and more accessible to the public through the online courses that have been made available recently.  A simple tour at the official government website of the state will be able to provide you with more information that you will need.

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